Tips for Taking Better Fall Photos

Saturday, 25 September 2010 11:30

Autumn is a special and an enchanting season to experiment with your camera and capture some beautiful colors. Here are some photography tips and ideas on how to photograph fall foliage:

 

 

 

Autumn is a special and an enchanting season to experiment with your camera and capture some beautiful colors. It happens every year, but still feels fresh and remarkable every time. Here are some photography tips and ideas on how to photograph fall foliage:

 

Filters

Capturing bright fall colors on film can be greatly enhanced through the use of either a warming or a polarizing filter. A warming filter casts a warm hue over the entire scene, thus enhancing yellow, orange, red and brown tones in your photos. A polarizing filter will reduce unwanted glare that commonly appears on leaves and on the surface of streams, rivers, and lakes. A polarizing filter will also deepen blue skies and better define clouds.

Fall Photo

Weather

Though sunny days usually attract more leaf-lookers, overcast days can actually result in better photographs. Cloud cover allows light to be scattered which eliminates unwanted shadows and allows for greater color saturation. Overcast and even rainy days are ideal conditions for shooting waterfalls, streams, and hiking trails in deep forest areas. Time of Day Lighting is usually most dramatic during early morning or early evening hours. Among the most accessible places to see good light from both the rising and setting sun are Waterrock Knob on the Blue Ridge Parkway and Clingman's Dome in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

 

Macro

Macro photography is a style of shooting images super close-up where you see lots of texture and detail. Most all cameras have this feature and it's a great setting to experiment and play around with. Try turning on your macro setting and get great leaf and pumpkin textures.

Fall Photo

Composition

This term is used when talking about how objects are positioned in a photo. How you compose a shot is telling a story of what you want to focus on. A carefully placed boulder, tree, leaf, or person can add great depth to your images.

 

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Last Updated on Monday, 13 December 2010 14:49